etiquette for pull requests

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etiquette for pull requests

Deniz Yuret
I have submitted a bug and a pull request for a package three weeks ago, but did not hear back from the owner.  I have permission to update the package.  Should I go ahead and do it?  What is the correct etiquette for this situation?

best,
deniz

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etiquette for pull requests

Tony Kelman
Are you the only person other than the original author who has commit access? I assume you've tried pinging the author every week or so, with no luck? Does the package have many other users or contributors who are more active on github you might be able to ask to review your change? I think this would be fine to merge your own PR if the author has given you commit access, assuming you made a best effort to try to get their explicit approval. Worst case they could revert your changes down the road and/or you could fork the package.
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Re: etiquette for pull requests

Isaiah Norton

One common approach, especially for the first few PRs after one is granted commit access, is to say "will merge tomorrow (or X date) if there are no objections". This is even common for experi nced committees when a PR review status is unclear.

On Oct 10, 2015 12:03 PM, "Tony Kelman" <[hidden email]> wrote:
Are you the only person other than the original author who has commit access? I assume you've tried pinging the author every week or so, with no luck? Does the package have many other users or contributors who are more active on github you might be able to ask to review your change? I think this would be fine to merge your own PR if the author has given you commit access, assuming you made a best effort to try to get their explicit approval. Worst case they could revert your changes down the road and/or you could fork the package.