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getting started

Ross Boylan
Is there anything that is intermediate between the manual and the introductory material that is kind of a "taste of"?
I've looked in the documentation and teaching sections (not sure if the latter is relevant if I don't plan to teach with Julia), but haven't found anything that looked right.  I notice there are some videos, but I find that slow way to get information.

Analogs for C: Kernighan and Ritchie, not Harbison and Steele;
for C++: Stroustrup, not the C++ standard.

Otherwise I guess I can skim.

Thanks.
Ross Boylan
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Re: getting started

João Felipe Santos
There's this nice "programming by example"-style tutorial that you can skim to get a grasp of the syntax, features, and standard libraries, as well as some plotting libs: http://bogumilkaminski.pl/files/julia_express.pdf.

--
João Felipe Santos


On Wed, Jul 23, 2014 at 3:38 AM, <[hidden email]> wrote:
Is there anything that is intermediate between the manual and the introductory material that is kind of a "taste of"?
I've looked in the documentation and teaching sections (not sure if the latter is relevant if I don't plan to teach with Julia), but haven't found anything that looked right.  I notice there are some videos, but I find that slow way to get information.

Analogs for C: Kernighan and Ritchie, not Harbison and Steele;
for C++: Stroustrup, not the C++ standard.

Otherwise I guess I can skim.

Thanks.
Ross Boylan

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Re: getting started

Stefan Karpinski
Also this: http://learnxinyminutes.com/docs/julia/. David Sander's tutorial is a nice start as well, although it's quite a long video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vWkgEddb4-A.


On Wed, Jul 23, 2014 at 8:15 AM, João Felipe Santos <[hidden email]> wrote:
There's this nice "programming by example"-style tutorial that you can skim to get a grasp of the syntax, features, and standard libraries, as well as some plotting libs: http://bogumilkaminski.pl/files/julia_express.pdf.

--
João Felipe Santos


On Wed, Jul 23, 2014 at 3:38 AM, <[hidden email]> wrote:
Is there anything that is intermediate between the manual and the introductory material that is kind of a "taste of"?
I've looked in the documentation and teaching sections (not sure if the latter is relevant if I don't plan to teach with Julia), but haven't found anything that looked right.  I notice there are some videos, but I find that slow way to get information.

Analogs for C: Kernighan and Ritchie, not Harbison and Steele;
for C++: Stroustrup, not the C++ standard.

Otherwise I guess I can skim.

Thanks.
Ross Boylan


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Re: getting started

Ross Boylan
In reply to this post by João Felipe Santos
On Wed, 2014-07-23 at 11:15 -0400, João Felipe Santos wrote:
> There's this nice "programming by example"-style tutorial that you can
> skim to get a grasp of the syntax, features, and standard libraries,
> as well as some plotting
> libs: http://bogumilkaminski.pl/files/julia_express.pdf.
>
> --
> João Felipe Santos
Thank you.  That's about what I was looking for.

It seems odd that [1; 2] != [1 2]'; typeof shows the former is
1-dimensional and the latter 2-dimensional (if I'm interpreting
correctly), but that seems kind of inconsistent.

>
>
> On Wed, Jul 23, 2014 at 3:38 AM, <[hidden email]> wrote:
>         Is there anything that is intermediate between the manual and
>         the introductory material that is kind of a "taste of"?
>         I've looked in the documentation and teaching sections (not
>         sure if the latter is relevant if I don't plan to teach with
>         Julia), but haven't found anything that looked right.  I
>         notice there are some videos, but I find that slow way to get
>         information.
>        
>        
>         Analogs for C: Kernighan and Ritchie, not Harbison and Steele;
>         for C++: Stroustrup, not the C++ standard.
Probably a better comparison would be to the intro documents that are
part of the R
(http://cran.r-project.org/doc/manuals/r-release/R-intro.html) and
Python distributions (https://docs.python.org/3/tutorial/index.html).
The julia manual looks very good, but something a bit more approachable
would be helpful to get people started.

Ross



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Re: getting started

Ross Boylan
In reply to this post by Stefan Karpinski
On Wed, 2014-07-23 at 09:00 -0700, Stefan Karpinski wrote:
> Also this: http://learnxinyminutes.com/docs/julia/.
That was one of the first things I looked at; I liked it a lot, but then
needed something more.
Ross

> David Sander's tutorial is a nice start as well, although it's quite a
> long video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vWkgEddb4-A.
>
>
> On Wed, Jul 23, 2014 at 8:15 AM, João Felipe Santos
> <[hidden email]> wrote:
>         There's this nice "programming by example"-style tutorial that
>         you can skim to get a grasp of the syntax, features, and
>         standard libraries, as well as some plotting
>         libs: http://bogumilkaminski.pl/files/julia_express.pdf.
>        
>         --
>         João Felipe Santos
>        
>        
>         On Wed, Jul 23, 2014 at 3:38 AM, <[hidden email]>
>         wrote:
>                 Is there anything that is intermediate between the
>                 manual and the introductory material that is kind of a
>                 "taste of"?
>                 I've looked in the documentation and teaching sections
>                 (not sure if the latter is relevant if I don't plan to
>                 teach with Julia), but haven't found anything that
>                 looked right.  I notice there are some videos, but I
>                 find that slow way to get information.
>                
>                
>                 Analogs for C: Kernighan and Ritchie, not Harbison and
>                 Steele;
>                 for C++: Stroustrup, not the C++ standard.
>                
>                
>                 Otherwise I guess I can skim.
>                
>                
>                 Thanks.
>                 Ross Boylan
>        
>        
>
>


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Re: getting started

Sam Lendle
In reply to this post by Ross Boylan

It seems odd that [1; 2] != [1 2]'; typeof shows the former is
1-dimensional and the latter 2-dimensional (if I'm interpreting
correctly), but that seems kind of inconsistent.

A similar issue with indexing surprised me recently. If A is a 2-d array, A[:, 1] is a 1-d array but A[1, :] is a 2-d array.  The behavior you pointed out can sort of be deduced from concatenation section of the multi-dimensional arrays part of the manual, and the indexing behavior is in the indexing section.  ("Trailing dimensions indexed with scalars are dropped.")

Maybe those points should be emphasized in the manual.

By the way, [1; 2] does happen to equal [1 2]' because [1 2]' reshapes [1 2] to a 2x1 array. However, [1; 2]' != [1 2].
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Re: getting started

Ross Boylan
On Wed, 2014-07-23 at 14:43 -0700, Sam L wrote:

>        
>         It seems odd that [1; 2] != [1 2]'; typeof shows the former
>         is
>         1-dimensional and the latter 2-dimensional (if I'm
>         interpreting
>         correctly), but that seems kind of inconsistent.
>
> A similar issue with indexing surprised me recently. If A is a 2-d
> array, A[:, 1] is a 1-d array but A[1, :] is a 2-d array.  The
> behavior you pointed out can sort of be deduced from concatenation
> section of the multi-dimensional arrays part of the manual, and the
> indexing behavior is in the indexing section.  ("Trailing dimensions
> indexed with scalars are dropped.")
>
> Maybe those points should be emphasized in the manual.
The only reason I was aware of the problem was that the
http://bogumilkaminski.pl/files/julia_express.pdf document highlights
it, along with the gotcha you ran into.
>
> By the way, [1; 2] does happen to equal [1 2]' because [1 2]' reshapes
> [1 2] to a 2x1 array. However, [1; 2]' != [1 2].
Huh?
julia> [1; 2] == [1 2]'
false

julia> isequal([1; 2], [1 2]')
false

Ross
>


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Re: getting started

Sam Lendle
Oops, not sure where I got that idea, you are correct! I could have sworn I tried that in the REPL... Brain glitch I suppose.

On Wednesday, July 23, 2014 4:52:08 PM UTC-7, Ross Boylan wrote:
On Wed, 2014-07-23 at 14:43 -0700, Sam L wrote:

>        
>         It seems odd that [1; 2] != [1 2]'; typeof shows the former
>         is
>         1-dimensional and the latter 2-dimensional (if I'm
>         interpreting
>         correctly), but that seems kind of inconsistent.
>
> A similar issue with indexing surprised me recently. If A is a 2-d
> array, A[:, 1] is a 1-d array but A[1, :] is a 2-d array.  The
> behavior you pointed out can sort of be deduced from concatenation
> section of the multi-dimensional arrays part of the manual, and the
> indexing behavior is in the indexing section.  ("Trailing dimensions
> indexed with scalars are dropped.")
>
> Maybe those points should be emphasized in the manual.
The only reason I was aware of the problem was that the
<a href="http://bogumilkaminski.pl/files/julia_express.pdf" target="_blank" onmousedown="this.href='http://www.google.com/url?q\75http%3A%2F%2Fbogumilkaminski.pl%2Ffiles%2Fjulia_express.pdf\46sa\75D\46sntz\0751\46usg\75AFQjCNEeoFn_yvWaO1YXyWa9TlLAdHgh1A';return true;" onclick="this.href='http://www.google.com/url?q\75http%3A%2F%2Fbogumilkaminski.pl%2Ffiles%2Fjulia_express.pdf\46sa\75D\46sntz\0751\46usg\75AFQjCNEeoFn_yvWaO1YXyWa9TlLAdHgh1A';return true;">http://bogumilkaminski.pl/files/julia_express.pdf document highlights
it, along with the gotcha you ran into.
>
> By the way, [1; 2] does happen to equal [1 2]' because [1 2]' reshapes
> [1 2] to a 2x1 array. However, [1; 2]' != [1 2].
Huh?
julia> [1; 2] == [1 2]'
false

julia> isequal([1; 2], [1 2]')
false

Ross
>


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